DataTwoHearts Superwhoavengepotterlock For Violin
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You just have to feel it. You’ll know, okay? You just have to let it happen. And then, probably when you’re not looking, you’ll find someone who compliments you.

(Source: lookatthelights, via pandreaa)

lordhayati:


drtanner:

dancingspirals:

ironychan:

hungrylikethewolfie:

dduane:


A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting)

(sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful.

I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern.

Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down.

Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking.
If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread.
Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty.
Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic.

Holy shit. 
Bread is serious fucking business.


Man the bread fandom don’t put up with shit at all.

lordhayati:

drtanner:

dancingspirals:

ironychan:

hungrylikethewolfie:

dduane:

A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting)

(sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful.

I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern.

Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down.

Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking.

If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread.

Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty.

Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic.

Holy shit. 

Bread is serious fucking business.

Man the bread fandom don’t put up with shit at all.

(Source: wine-loving-vagabond, via doonarose)

stylinfcuk:

laughing so hard because this is so accurate

(via crazedlunatic)

disney ladies + books

(via booksandquills)

Six mistakes mankind keeps making century after century:
Believing that personal gain is made by crushing others;
Worrying about things that cannot be changed or corrected;
Insisting that a thing is impossible because we cannot accomplish it;
Refusing to set aside trivial preferences;
Neglecting development and refinement of the mind;
Attempting to compel others to believe and live as we do.
Cicero, 106 BC - 43 BC  (via thelittlephilosopher)

(Source: lazyyogi, via doonarose)

wolfofthemoon:

"They’re too close to be "just friends"!"

No

"Look! They care for each other! They must be in love!”

Stop

"They talk to each other  a lot! Its so cannon that they’re gay for each other!"

image

STOP DEVALUING FRIENDSHIPS!

ROMANCE/SEX IS NOT SUPERIOR TO FRIENDSHIP!

PEOPLE CAN LOVE AND CARE FOR EACH OTHER WITHOUT BEING ROMANTICALLY/SEXUALLY INVOLVED!

PLATONIC RELATIONSHIPS ARE NOT INFERIOR TO ROMANTIC/SEXUAL ONES!

(via doonarose)

sexybaldwin:

Obey the wise words of the lovely Cecil Baldwin: Keep it cute. (x)

sexybaldwin:

Obey the wise words of the lovely Cecil Baldwin: Keep it cute. (x)

(via knittywriter)

irreducibilitas:

Grimm and Other Folk Tales

by Cory Godbey

(via doonarose)

Don’t let stupid things destroy your happiness.
Unknown (via onlinecounsellingcollege)

(via irska)

ally0mazing:

Harry potter and the sorceror’s sass
The chamber of sassiness
The prisoner of sasskaban
The goblet of sass
The sass blood prince
The sassy hallows

The sassiest boy who lived…..

(via cpcoulter)

evashandor:

brownfatfemme:

merpldom:

merpldom:

So I’ve seen this post going around in link form, which isn’t super useful to anyone who wants to read it, so I put it up in photo form. Useful for anyone who doesn’t have xkit. :3 Definitely like and reblog the OP, but if it shows up as a link, this helps. :3

I fixed the link for the OP so it works now :)

NEED THIS IN MY LIFE RN!!! THANK YOU TUMBLR!

I suck at cover letters so this is fab

(Source: merplmom, via slayerkitty)

an-abundance-of-lainey:

This cake is amazing.

an-abundance-of-lainey:

This cake is amazing.

(via hazelandglasz)

Hi I'm Bridget. 23, Australian, Gleek, Whovian, Starkid, Potterhead.